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The SPE Library contains thousands of papers, presentations, journal briefs and recorded webinars from the best minds in the Plastics Industry. Spanning almost two decades, this collection of published research and development work in polymer science and plastics technology is a wealth of knowledge and information for anyone involved in plastics.

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Vinyl Plastics

Vinyl Building Materials Recycling Update
Richard Krock, September 2010

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.

Flexible Vinyl Alliance
Kevin Ott, September 2010

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.

The Importance of Risk Assessment as a Materials Selection Criterion
Richard Krock, September 2010

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.

Vinyl Siding and Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities
David S. Johnston, September 2010

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.

RPVC Powder in the Single Screw Extruder Improvements in Feeding, Output, Mixing and Venting
Keith Luker, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Earth Friendly Technologies Applied to Twin Screw Extruder Design
Tom Brown, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Evaluation of Fusible PVCTM Pipe as a Sustainable Infrastructure Solution
Bob Walker, May 2009

As issues regarding environmental protection and sustainability have moved higher on public and political agendas, the demand for PVC pipe has also risen. The current North American market for PVC pipes and fittings exceeds six billion pounds annually and PVC pipes account for the majority of new water and wastewater pipelines. Indeed, the PVC pipe industry owes much of its success to environmentalists and the environmental movement. More importantly, our environment has benefited immensely as a result of the widespread use of PVC pipe.

REACH After Preregistration Strategic Issues Facing North American Businesses
Bob Drake, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Sustainability through Innovation: The PVC Heat Stabilizer Advapak NEO
Jian-Yang Cho | Eric Lundquist | Muriel Hebrard, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Liquid calcium zinc stabilizers-Sustainable liquid stabilizers for flexible PVC.
Ben Labovitz, May 2009

Calcium zinc liquid stabilizers can replace other mixed metal stabilizers in flexible PVC compounds. Ca/Zn liquids are a sustainable and low toxicity option compared to barium, cadmium, and tin based stabilizers.

Liquid calcium zinc stabilizers-Sustainable liquid stabilizers for flexible PVC.
Ben Labovitz, May 2009

Calcium zinc liquid stabilizers can replace other mixed metal stabilizers in flexible PVC compounds. Ca/Zn liquids are a sustainable and low toxicity option compared to barium, cadmium, and tin based stabilizers.

Polymer Modifiers for Sustainable PVC Applications
Elizabeth R. Griffin, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Achieving Dimensional Stability in Vinyl Building Products
Elvira B. Rabinovitch, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Landfill Biodegradation of Vinyl
Richard F. Grossman, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

Inside The Architectural Products Marketplace
George Middleton, May 2009

PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec Conference 2009.

The New Climate of Political Toxicology and What it Means to Plastics Producers
Devin Wm. Hill, May 2009

Chemical substances are under increasing attack from consumer groups, legislators, and certain segments of the scientific community. These attacks have led to decisions being based on “political toxicology.” Advocates seeking to restrict or eliminate the use of chemicals are able to leverage public reaction to results obtained from unconventional and esoteric studies to condemn a substance even when data based on accepted toxicological principles and validated protocols support a safety conclusion. Those advocating these policies seem to believe that simply banning chemicals will achieve an alluring ideal that all potential risk can be avoided, often without any thought to adverse consequences of their actions. This presentation will discuss the current regulatory and political climate that is evolving around the use of chemical substances, particularly when these chemicals are used in contact with food or in consumer products used by infants and children. Mr. Hill will present examples of the increasing number of legislative and regulatory initiatives at the local, state, federal level that are affecting the future use of chemical substances and the increased burden on industry. Finally, the presentation will provide some insight on how companies can position themselves in this climate of political toxicology and proactively defend the use of safe and effective products from pseudoscience and public misconception.

Most recent developments in Mineral Additives – basis for sustainable and ecofriendly stabilizers
Reiner Sauerwein, May 2009

The public perception of PVC is changing throughout the world. In Europe a lot of emotional discussion was going on in the past, with a peak at the end of the last century. This has changed during the very previous years – PVC has gained a relatively good public perception and acceptance in Europe again. The voluntary Vinyl 2010 initiative has been successful in establishing joined forces within the PVC process chain to generate trust in the move for sustainability of the whole industry. Besides tremendous work in the field of PVC recycling, the substitution of hazardous or critical additives in heat stabilizers is one of the key topics that lead to this positive change in public acceptance.

Formulating Flexible PVC for Long Service Life - Effects on Eco-Friendliness
Paul H. Daniels, May 2009

A significant fraction of the flexible PVC products produced in the US consists of durable goods, products with intended service lives of three years or (sometimes much) more. Geomembranes, roofing membranes, vinyl wallcovering and flooring, electrical wire insulation are all examples of long-lived flexible PVC products. Obviously, flexible PVC can be designed for the long term. But flexible PVC (like other plastics) is often accused of being a readily disposable commodity that when discarded contributes to roadside litter or endures for hundreds of years (or longer) in landfills. Which is it? Does formulating flexible PVC for long service life make it less eco-friendly? In this paper the steps involved in designing flexible PVC for long service life and the some ecological impacts of long-lived flexible PVC products are examined.

Formulating Flexible PVC for Long Service Life - Effects on Eco-Friendliness
Paul H. Daniels, May 2009

A significant fraction of the flexible PVC products produced in the US consists of durable goods, products with intended service lives of three years or (sometimes much) more. Geomembranes, roofing membranes, vinyl wallcovering and flooring, electrical wire insulation are all examples of long-lived flexible PVC products. Obviously, flexible PVC can be designed for the long term. But flexible PVC (like other plastics) is often accused of being a readily disposable commodity that when discarded contributes to roadside litter or endures for hundreds of years (or longer) in landfills. Which is it? Does formulating flexible PVC for long service life make it less eco-friendly? In this paper the steps involved in designing flexible PVC for long service life and the some ecological impacts of long-lived flexible PVC products are examined.







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Brown, H. L. and Jones, D. H. 2016, May.
"Insert title of paper here in quotes,"
ANTEC 2016 - Indianapolis, Indiana, USA May 23-25, 2016. [On-line].
Society of Plastics Engineers
Available: www.4spe.org.

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