SPE Library

The SPE Library contains thousands of papers, presentations, journal briefs and recorded webinars from the best minds in the Plastics Industry. Spanning almost two decades, this collection of published research and development work in polymer science and plastics technology is a wealth of knowledge and information for anyone involved in plastics.

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Sustainability
Various topics related to sustainability in plastics, including bio-related, environmental issues, green, recycling, renewal, re-use and sustainability.
High Whiteness Masking Masterbatch for Film Applications
Sushanta D. Roy, Sam D’Uva, May 2006
Repro" or recycled polymer waste has been utilized in the polymer industry for years. In the manufacture of polyethylene films it is desired to introduce repro (recycled film scrap etc.) back into the film process. The recycled resin stream often contains residual inks or colorants which adversely affects the desired color of the final product when producing white films. A new masterbatch "Reproclean" has been developed to help mask the color of the recycled resin in the final film product. Results indicate that Reproclean significantly improves the whiteness and brightness indices of white polymer films."
Impact Properties of Recycled PET Prepared by Reactive Compounding
Noriaki Kunimune, Hiroyuki Inoya, Shigeyuki Nagata, Kazushi Yamada, Masaya Kotaki, Hiroyuki Hamada, May 2006
We’ve aimed to develop high impact strength materials from waste PET. Recycled PET with impact strength as high as polycarbonate (PC) was successfully developed by reactive compounding with polymer with epoxy group. Structure development of the recycled PET in the reactive compounding was discussed on the basis of fracture surface observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) analysis, Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC).
Influence of Compounding Conditions on Mechanical Properties of Recycled Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate)
Noriaki Kunimune, Hiroyuki Inoya, Shigeyuki Nagata, Kazushi Yamada, Masaya Kotaki, Hiroyuki Hamada, May 2006
We have prepared several types of recycled materials from waste poly-(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) through different compounding conditions. As a result, modified recycled- PET (R-PET) with strength similar to virgin PET has been successfully developed. In this paper, structure and mechanical properties of the modified R-PET immersed in hot water were investigated on the basis of tensile test, impact test, Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC).
Interfacial Adhesion in Bamboo Fiber/Biodegradable Polymer Composites
M. Nakamura, K. Kitagawa, H. Okumura, U.S. Ishiaku, M. Kotaki, H. Hamada, May 2006
Surface treatment with natural resin on bamboo fibers is hypothesized to improve the interfacial adhesion between bamboo fibers and biodegradable polymers. Effect of the surface treatment on the interfacial adhesion was investigated by evaluation of mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the composites.
Measurement of Fuel Barrier Properties of Rotational Molded Materials
B.A. Graham, D. Cook, May 2006
Future California Air Resources Board (CARB) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel emission standards will change the rotational molding industry. This study outlines an apparatus and test method useful to screen various materials relative to these new standards. Quantification of permeation rate and the identification of individual permeating components were conducted on actual coupons from rotational molded parts. A correlation to rotomolded tanks is presented with the preferred material candidates being explained.
Mechanical Properties of Soy Protein Isolate/Soy Hydrolysate Plastics
Maria Vlad, Jay-lin Jane, Perminus Mungara, David Grewell, May 2006
Biodegradable plastics based on soy protein isolate were prepared with soy hydrolysate as a plasticizer via different methods, and the mechanical properties of the samples from the different processing methods were tested and compared. The results indicated that the tensile strength and the elongation at break of the samples with soy hydrolysate were enhanced when the preparation process consisted of extrusion followed by injection molding or compression molding, but no improvement was noticed in the case of the compression molding without prior extrusion.
Mechanical Recycling of Injection-Molded Wood-Thermoplastic Composites
Maja Rujni?-Sokele, Mladen Šercer, Gordana Bari?, May 2006
Wood-thermoplastic composites are usually processed by extrusion, and therefore an attempt has been made to study their suitability for injection molding. The experiments were made to study the behavior of the wood flour-polypropylene composite during injection molding, and to what extent the mechanical properties deteriorate after several processing cycles, i.e. mechanical recycling.
Crystallization Enhancement of Poly(L-Lactide) by Carbon Nanotubes
Yeong-Tarng Shieh, Gin-Lung Liu, May 2006
In this work, we started the preparation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by the CVD method. Following surface modifications, MWNTs were grafted with poly(L-lactide) to obtain poly(L-lactide)-grafted MWNTs (or MWNTs-g-PLLA). Prior to investigation on whether the MWNTs-g-PLLA could be an effective reinforcement for the semicrystalline, biocompatible and biodegradable PLLA, we investigated the effects of MWNTs on the crystallization of PLLA in the nanocomposites (PLLA/MWNTs-g-PLLA) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The MWNTs was found to significantly enhance the crystallization of PLLA.
Degradability of Commercially Available Biodegradable Packages in Real Composting and Ambient Conditions
Gaurav Kale, Rafael Auras, Sher Paul Singh, May 2006
The demand for environmentally-friendly biodegradable packaging is a growing area, reflecting consumer and retailer awareness of the issues of waste disposal. Compostability has, so far, been the main focus of applications of biobased packaging materials, which is the natural outcome for a vast amount of packaging materials and waste. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degradability of four commercially available Poly (lactide) packages, a bottle, a tray and two deli containers, in real composting and ambient environment conditions. The correlation of the package’s properties changes with time was examined. The physical property breakdown was monitored by visual inspection; GPC, DSC, and TGA.
Phenomenon of Gas Fading in Thermoplastic Elastomer in Automotive Interior Applications
J. McCoy, K. MacInnis, A. Montalvo, M.R. Sadeghi, May 2006
Thermoplastic Elastomers (TPE) are suitable materials for automotive interior applications. TPE can be adequately stabilized for protection against extended exposure to UV and heat during compounding, subsequent fabrication, and end use. Under certain environmental conditions, material discoloration can occur. We will explore the nature of this discoloration, and review the current technology to eliminate it.
Recycling Non-Halogen FR-PC/ABS
Paul Moy, May 2006
PC/ABS composites used extensively for laptop housings have grown significantly in the plastic waste stream. For these systems, required flame retardancy is done either through system design or composite formulations. Many manufacturers opt for non-halogen FRs such as triaryl phosphates. This paper will look at these options, measuring properties relative to recycling issues and using common industrial practices, present performance in a realistic recycling program. This study also considers additives found useful as stabilizers.
Recycling of Latex Based Paint as Polymer Feedstock Materials
Jennifer K. Lynch, Thomas J. Nosker, Robert Hamill, Richard L. Lehman, May 2006
This work investigates the recycling of used latex paints into non-paint products. Waste latex paint was collected, dried, and prepared for mixing as polymer feedstock. This feedstock was melt-blended with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) at various composition ratios by injection molding. Tensile mechanical properties and thermal properties of paint/HDPE and paint/PMMA polymer blends were determined. Thermal analysis revealed that these blends are immiscible.
Recycling Thermosets: The Use of High-Pressure High-Temperature Sintering (HPHTS) and Degraded Material as Means of Producing New Products
Drew E. Williams, Richard J. Farris, May 2006
High-Pressure High-Temperature Sintering (HPHTS) of waste thermosets allowed for the production of new parts from 100% recycled material. This technique along with utilizing degraded material as filler has resulted in the successful recycling of thermosetting materials at high recycle levels. Finally, Chemicals Stress Relaxation experiments offered excellent insight into the mechanism of HPHTS and the degradation process.
Effect of Preparation Method on the Rheological Behavior of Waterborne Polyurethane Dispersion
Samy A. Madbouly, Joshua U. Otaigbe, Ajaya K. Nanda, Douglas A. Wicks, May 2006
Two classes of environmentally-friendly polyurethane dispersions have been prepared via prepolymer emulsification process and acetone process. Rheological behavior of these dispersions has been studied as functions of PU-concentration, degree of post-neutralization and temperature. At a critical volume fraction of PU (? ~0.43), a dramatic increase in the reduced zero shear viscosity was detected for the two dispersions. Co-occurrence of thermal-induced gelation and liquid-liquid phase separation was observed for the prepolymer process, while, only liquid-liquid phase separation was discovered both rheologically and morphologically for the acetone process.
Effects of Montmorillonite Layered Silicates on the Crystallization Properties of Polylactic Acid
Timmy Chan, May 2006
Recently, polylactic Acid (PLA) has been increasingly considered for many applications due to its origin from renewable resources and its biodegradability. Separately, there has been interest in montmorillonite layered silicates (MLS), because of their remarkable ability to improve polymer properties. Strength and barrier properties are particular improvements to PLA that are considered critical. We examine the influence of MLS and processing on the crystallinity of PLA nanocomposites. Screw speed and feed rate of an extruder connected to a blown film die were systematically varied. The materials were supplied by the Naticak Army Research Laboratory and developed by Ratto and Thellen.Increasing screw speed during manufacturing decreases the residence time and is associated with the generation of smaller crystallites. Feed rate is another variable that is considered.Permeability and non isothermal Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) at a single heating rate was reported recently. Here we report on the Avrami parameters of the PLA and corresponding nanocomposites.
The Development of Soft TPO for Automobile Interior Skin That Enhance Recyclability
Seong Min Cho, Dong Myeong Shin, Dong Woo Lee, May 2006
This study investigates soft thermoplastic olefin (TPO) for automobile interior skin such as instrument and door trim panel skin in order to replace polyvinyl chloride(PVC) resin, enhance recyclability and solve environmental problem. In this study, we investigated TPO material requirement by each process and results indicated optimum material composition for each process.
Fabrication of Composite Pipe With Recycled Polycarbonate and Crushed FRP Products
Masanori Anan, Takahiro Okamoto, Hiroaki Okumura, Asami Nakai, Hiroyuki Hamada, May 2006
Injection molding with recycled polycarbonate (PC) and crushed FRP products was fabricated and examined on tensile, flexural and Izod impact test. The specimen of composition filled with 5wt% of FRP and modifier had highest mechanical properties. The composite had approximate equivalent tensile strength and higher Izod notched impact value than that of standard rigid PVC. Composite pipe made of this composition was manufactured by using extrusion process. The composite pipe has extreme high flexibility because in 50% diameter reduction of lateral compression test no fracture ccurred. Consequently, the composite pipe can become substitute of PVC.
Unexpected and Unusual Failures of Polymeric Materials
Myer Ezrin, Gary Lavigne, May 2006
Some failures are predictable, such as due to exposure to environmental conditions. In this paper the focus is on failures that there was no reason to expect. While they may become obvious, they are unpredictable. Some are unusual, involving a cause and effect on the plastic that are not obvious. Examples are cracking of nitrile rubber, contamination of GPC samples by a filter syringe, and PVC plasticizer used for many years being declared unsafe.
Use of UV Cured Coatings on Plastics
John Stansfield, May 2006
As plastics fill more roles, they must offer the same physical properties as the materials they replace. Radically reducing VOC emissions and hazardous waste is now mandatory in many areas. Specialized formulation of resins can meet these needs to some degree. Coating the molded parts addresses all these concerns. UV cured coatings meet the most stringent environmental standards, while duplicating the physical properties of glass, wood, light metal and high VOC printing and finishing inks.
WEEE and RoHS - Environmental Design Strategies
Timothy B. Austin, May 2006
Tough new environmental laws are rapidly spreading around the world that directly impact product design. Failure to heed them will result in lost revenue and increase the cost of doing business. This paper explains what they are and details essential strategies for dealing with them.


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