SPE Library

The SPE Library contains thousands of papers, presentations, journal briefs and recorded webinars from the best minds in the Plastics Industry. Spanning almost two decades, this collection of published research and development work in polymer science and plastics technology is a wealth of knowledge and information for anyone involved in plastics.

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Conference Proceedings
DOW ECOLIBRIUM™ Bio-Based Plasticizers - Greening of PVC with Renewably Sourced Plasticizers
Bharat I. Chaudhary | R. Eaton | B. Sczekalla | C. Laufer | B. Neese | A. Ghosh-Dastidar, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
High Performance PVC Roofing – An Active Asset
Ballensky, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
Landfill Biodegradation
Richard F. Grossman, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
NGO’s What is on the Horizon
Devon Wm. Hill, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
Vinyl Building Materials Recycling Update
Richard Krock, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
Flexible Vinyl Alliance
Kevin Ott, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
The Importance of Risk Assessment as a Materials Selection Criterion
Richard Krock, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
Vinyl Siding and Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities
David S. Johnston, September 2010
PowerPoint Presentation at Vinyltec 2010.
Economic Outlook
Robert Fry, September 2010
This presentation p contains forward‐looking statements based on expectations, estimates and projections that are not guarantees of future performance and involve a number of uncertainties and assumptions. The content is provided “AS IS,” “AS AVAILABLE.” DuPont does not warrant the accuracy or completeness of the information, text, graphics, links, or other items contained in this communication, and DuPont expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions in these materials. We reserve the right to make changes and corrections at any time, without notice. DuPont expressly disclaims all liability for the use or interpretation by others of information contained in this DuPont communication. Decisions based on information contained in this DuPont communication are the sole responsibility of the reader, and in exchange for using this DuPont communication the reader agrees to hold DuPont harmless against any claims for damages arising from any decisions that the reader makes based on such information. Nothing contained in this DuPont communication constitutes investment advice.
Non-Tin Heat Stabilizers for Clear rigid PVC Applications
Masumi Mizu | Taro Mitsudera | Tadashi Sengoku | Kiyotatsu Iwanami | Toshinori Yukino | Hiroshi Nishimura | Robert G. Weiler, September 2010
The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a new class of Calcium/Zinc heat stabilizer for clear rigid PVC applications. Typically, until this time, Organo-Tin based heat stabilizers have been used for this application. Organo-Tin heat stabilizers offer excellent transparency and good heat stability protection. Recently, Butyl-Tin based heat stabilizers have been designated as an environmental Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC) in EU. This has led us to research and develop alternative heat stabilizers for clear rigid PVC applications. Liquid Barium/Zinc based heat stabilizers offer good transparency but they typically do not have enough heat stability under rigid PVC processing conditions. They also have the environmental problem of the heavy metal, Barium. Typical Calcium/Zn stabilizers have good heat stability, and are environmentally more acceptable, but typically are deficient in transparency. Our purpose in this paper is to describe a technique for selecting individual components for a high transparency powder Calcium/Zinc heat stabilizer and to demonstrate that the transparency and heat stability are suitable for the task of protecting clear rigid PVC applications. Three important technical points necessary for improving transparency were described. First is refraction (Refractive index). Second is scattering (particle size). And third is dispersion (compatibility). Ideal state satisfied these three points.
CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRGIN-RPET COMPOSITES
Greg Curtzwiler , Keith L. Vorst , Wyatt Brown , J. Singh, May 2010
Thermoformed polyethylene terephthalate (PET) produce trays (clamshells) produced by a large retail supplier using virgin resin were compared to PET clamshells containing 30, 70, or 100% recycled-PET (RPET). Comparisons were made of functional groups, ultravioletvisible (UV-Vis) light absorption, and thermal properties. An increase in the crystallization temperature was observed as RPET increased when compared to virgin PET. This suggests that the crystallization temperature (Tc) may be used as a quantitative indicator for determining the amount of RPET in a plastic composite.
SYNTHESIS AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BIODEGRADABLE PLA/PHBV FOAMS
Esther Richards , Reza Rizvi , Andrew Chow , Hani Naguib, May 2010
This paper examines the effect that blending two biodegradable polymers has on the thermal properties and morphology of the resultant foams blown with carbon dioxide (CO2). Polylactic acid (PLA) Polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHBV) and blends of both were foamed and characterized in terms of thermal characteristics relative density cell size and foam morphology. The results indicate that although PLA and PHBV are immiscible the presence of small quantities of PHBV could lead to low density foams with finer more uniform cells.
DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF PLUG ' ASSIST THERMOFORMING
Hossein Hosseini , Boris V. Berdyshev , Ekaterina M. Kromskaya, May 2010
Plug-assist thermoforming is a well known technique in polymer processing due to its interesting features. The dynamic value of driving-force for the stretching process is determined based on equilibrium equation. This amount of force is required for applying to a plug in order to stretch a sheet. It is used for calculation of the required theoretical work, and power of a plug-assist thermoforming process. By using a non-linear viscoelastic rheological model in the proposed mathematical model, its validity was examined by performing experimental tests on ABS sheets.
ADDITIVE PROCESSING ƒ??NEW MATERIALS FOR FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING
Bettina Wendel , Claus M. Dallner , Ernst Schmachtenberg, May 2010
Additive processes are increasingly used to generate functional components in almost any geometry layer by layer directly from CAD-files without using tools and molds. Within the scope of this paper it is shown how the limited variety of materials can be extended for fused deposition modelling to reach new areas of application and how these new materials are to be manufactured. First functional prototypes could successfully be produced and characterized.
ADDITIVE PROCESSING – NEW MATERIALS FOR FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING
Bettina Wendel , Claus M. Dallner , Ernst Schmachtenberg, May 2010
Additive processes are increasingly used to generate functional components in almost any geometry layer by layer directly from CAD-files without using tools and molds. Within the scope of this paper it is shown how the limited variety of materials can be extended for fused deposition modelling to reach new areas of application and how these new materials are to be manufactured. First functional prototypes could successfully be produced and characterized.
PROCESSING AND PERFORMANCE OF HDPE POLYMER BLENDS INCLUDING POST CONSUMER RECYCLED HDPE
T. Beiss, C. Dallner, E. Schmachtenberg, May 2010
With the rapid increase in the market for recycled polyethylene from various sources, there is an urgent need to quantify the performance of these materials. Blends of recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE) were prepared to obtain specific mechanical properties and MFI. The results show that the MFIs had significant effect on the rheological, mechanical and phase morphology characteristics of the various blends.
VIBRATION JOINING OF FILAMENT REINFORCED THERMOSETS
T. Beiss , C. Dallner , E. Schmachtenberg, May 2010
At the Institute of Polymer Technology (LKT) a vibration joining technique was developed that offers short cycle times and represents a modification of hotmelt bonding using the machine technology from vibration welding. It is suitable to join thermoplastics with thermoset materials or thermosets using a thermoplastic interlayer by taking advantage of short cycle time and excellent lap-shear strength compared to bonding with reactive adhesives.
PROPYLENE BLOCK COPOLYMER AS A COMPATIBILIZER FOR POST CONSUMER HDPE/PP BLENDS
Nora Catalina Restrepo Zapata, Juan Manuel Vélez Restrepo, May 2010
Melt compounded polymer blends such as PP/HDPE blends from post consumer waste have often been reported to exhibit poor mechanical properties. This work reports on the potential improvement in performance of PP/HDPE blends using polypropylene copolymers as compatibilizers. The properties of the PP/HDPE blends in general progressively varied from that of 100% HDPE to 100% PP. Analysis showed some improvements in mechanical performance of the blends with the addition of PP copolymers, but DMTA results suggest no improvement in compatibility.
POLYMER FLOW ANALYSIS ON AN AUTOMOTIVE INSTRUMENT PANEL
Harsh Bhagat, May 2010
Mold filling simulations are sophisticated programs providing immense benefits for the plastics injection molding industry. The use of simulation techniques has improved the processability of large tools resulting in improved finished part quality.


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How to reference articles from the SPE Library:

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Brown, H. L. and Jones, D. H. 2016, May.
"Insert title of paper here in quotes,"
ANTEC 2016 - Indianapolis, Indiana, USA May 23-25, 2016. [On-line].
Society of Plastics Engineers
Available: www.4spe.org.

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