SPE Library

The SPE Library contains thousands of papers, presentations, journal briefs and recorded webinars from the best minds in the Plastics Industry. Spanning almost two decades, this collection of published research and development work in polymer science and plastics technology is a wealth of knowledge and information for anyone involved in plastics.

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Recycling
Various topics related to sustainability in plastics, including bio-related, environmental issues, green, recycling, renewal, re-use and sustainability.
WHEN IS IT TIME TO DIGITALLY DECORATE? MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICES.
Darlene Putz, May 2012
Industrial markets are ready to take advantage of direct to product decorating - printing to substrate. When is it time? Now is the time. The advantages are numerous: Inventory Reduction - on demand printing, Personalization - adding a new product level to current product line and added value to increase the bottom line, Green - very little waste and numerous recycling programs for consumable items. With advantages being clear, moving into the digial printing world requires a little preparation. Starting with how to select the appropriate printer from printhead selection to ink delivery system, ink selection, down to software. All key components in successfully moving into digitally printing. With a range of printing platforms from flatbed printers, high speed single pass systems to multipass systems - there is a solution for all decorating types. Taking the process step by step, being knowledable about the systems available and asking the right questions will put your company on the path to successful digital decoration in the production environment.
WIRELESS DEVICES DECORATED USING NON-CONDUCTIVE VACUUM METALLIZATION (NCVM) TECHNIQUES: CONSIDERATIONS AND COMMON FAILURE MODES
B. Varkey, Y. Huang, D.A. Wasylyshyn, May 2012
The Non-Conductive Vacuum Metallization (NCVM) process has become a mainstream metallization technology to achieve metallic like appearances on the surfaces of plastics used in wireless electronic devices while maintaining radio frequency (RF) functionality of the internal antennas. The impact on device performance and reliability of NCVM coatings has been discussed based on the most common failure modes and industrial testing standards. This paper discusses the effects of environmental conditions as well as construction variation of NCVM systems as they relate to various customer- impacting failure modes such as discoloration/corrosion, delamination and RF interference.
Uniquely identifying polymer composite domains using energy-dispersive spectroscopy
Richard Lehman, Giorgiana Giancola, April 2012
Discriminating between microscopic regions of component polymers that have chemically similar structures enables characterization of the phase-inversion composition of a biobased immiscible blend.
Thermally stable biopolymer for tissue scaffolds
Shuen-Hung Lo, Bor-Kuan Chen, March 2012
Modifying poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) with acryloyloxyethyl isocyanate increases the thermal decomposition temperature by 27°C and improves its mechanical properties.
Recycled Materials Data Collection
Keith D. Weyer, March 2012
Company wide protocol: Establish a central data collection/analysis system  Build continual improvement into program  Inter-plant material exchange  Reduction in material costs  Reduction in landfill costs
Sustainable Plastic Packaging: Renew and Recycle
Dr. Shell Huang, March 2012
The Coca-Cola Company: 2020 Vision; Sustainability: Packaging Material Strategy; PET Recycle: Bottle to Bottle and Bottle to Others; PlantBottle® Packaging: Close the Loop - Renew and Recycle
Sustainability from Start to Finish: The Lifecycle Impacts of Plastic Packaging
Kelly Polich, March 2012
Why is Packaging Important? Fundamentals & Definitions of Bio-Plastics  Material Innovations from Dow  Bio-Plastics and the Environment  Bio-based Sustainability  End of Life (Current and Future/New)  FTC Guidelines Considerations  Conclusions
Toward better treatment for clogged arteries
Yuan Yuan, Yaru Han, Suming Li , Zhongyong Fan, March 2012
Bioresorbable composites prepared for mechanical performance are promising candidates as cardiovascular stent material.
Improved biodegradability and mechanical properties of modified starch blends
Jun Zhang, Shan Hu, Huliang Gao, March 2012
Poly(lactic acid) is an efficient way to reduce cost and improve the attributes of starch blends.
Porous scaffolds based on poly(L-lysine)/microcrystalline cellulose biocomposite
Mohamed Farag Eldessouki , Gisela Buschle-Diller, Yasser Gowayed, January 2012
The unique features of poly(L-lysine) and microcrystalline cellulose combine to produce a more stable material for tissue-engineering scaffolds.
Kenaf-fiber-reinforced copolyester biocomposites
Babu Guduri, Thabang Mokhothu, Adriaan Luyt, January 2012
Alkali-treated kenaf fibers improve the thermal and mechanical properties of an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester resin.
Improving biodegradable polymer nanocomposites
Lisong Dong, Lijing Han, January 2012
Adding silica nanoparticles to poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) by melt compounding makes it stronger but more brittle.
Enhanced crystallization of polylactide by adding a multiamide compound
Guangyi Chen, Jicai Liang, Ping Song, Zhiyong Wei , Wanxi Zhang, January 2012
A multiamide nucleating agent, N,N',N"- -tricyclohexyl-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylamide, promotes the nucleation process of polylactide and further accelerates its overall crystallization rate.
High-performance biobased polymer composites
Dennis P. Wiesenborn, Judith D. Espinoza-Perez, December 2011
Polymers based on canola and soybean oils perform well in E-glass fiber reinforced composites, thanks to carefully selected curing agents.
2,5-FURANDICARBOXYLIC ACID; A VERSATILE BUILDING BLOCK FOR A VERY INTERESTING CLASS OF POLYESTERS
Matheus A. Dam | Gert-Jan M. Gruter |, Laszlo Sipos | Ed de Jong | Dirk Den Ouden, November 2011
Avantium is developing a next generation bioplastics based on 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA), called “YXY building blocks”, which can be produced on the basis of sugars and other, non-food, carbohydrates. Avantium aims to replace oil-based polyesters (such as PET) with Furanics polyesters (such as PEF) in a wide range of applications, including bottles and carpets.
AUTOMOTIVE SUNROOF SYSTEMS AND FRAMES IN XIRAN® SMA/ABS
Henri-Paul Benichou, November 2011
Automotive Sunroof Systems, which have become a must have for the added comfort and styling to today s cars, increasingly rely on engineering plastics functionalities to replace metals. Structural and semi-structural Sunroof module components, Sunroof frames in particular, typically need to meet a wide range of technical requirements, with a clear focus on integration of functions, safety, cost and weight reduction. The glass-reinforced materials, thermoplastics and thermosets, currently used for Sunroof frames are mostly based on PBT/ASA, PBT, PA, PP and unsaturated polyester SMC. These products are not a perfect match for the application needs of today and the future. Glass-reinforced SMA/ABS on the other hand offers an ideal, unique combination of properties required in Sunroof frames and systems. SMA/ABS-GF compounds such as Polyscope s Xiran® SG grades have clear technical and commercial benefits: • high dimensional stability and precision • very low warpage, compliance to mold cavity shape • good performance at low wall thicknesses • high creep resistance • excellent adhesion without surface treatment • low density, high economic value • good chemical resistance • easy recyclablility with efficient waste streams.
CBT AS A NOVEL MATRIX MATERIAL AND ITS PROCESSING TECHNIQUES FOR COMPOSITES
Gabor Balogh, November 2011
Cyclic butylene terephthalate (CBT) is a novel thermoplastic matrix material for composites. Besides its low viscosity (0,02 Pas) and superior mechanical properties CBT has some other advantages over conventional matrix materials. During its polymerization no by-product is being made and it is easy to recycle. But processing of CBT is complicated and may results in a brittle material. Polycaprolactone (PCL) as an additive for CBT will also be introduced to increase toughness. In this paper the proper amount of PCL is determined to obtain a ductile material and a method is described how to fabricate prepregs and composites.
CHAIN EXTENSION OF RECYCLED POLYAMIDES : HOW TO INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF RECYCLED PA IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY
Elodie Gaouyat, November 2011
The present work attempts to implement reactive compatibilisation of blends of recycled engineering plastics, more particularly the case of recycled PA66 contaminated by recycled PA6. Low molecular weight, high Tg Styrene-Maleic Anhydride copolymers were tested as chain extenders / compatibilizers. It appeared that the addition of 2% by weight of SMA to an incompatible system of recycled PA6 and PA66 improved both ductility and impact performance by factors of at least 10 and 1.5 respectively. Moreover, high Tg SMA improved performances at elevated temperature, partly due to its ability to effectively crosslink but also because of its inherent heat resistance.
MOLD OPTIMIZATION FOR METAL INSERT INJECTION MOLDING PROCESS
Massimo Natalini | Marco Sasso, November 2011
High quality, coupled with high efficiency of the process are two of the most important requirements for goods intended for automotive market. The case study here presented demonstrates how to satisfy quality requirements and increase production efficiency, while reducing production waste. An injection molding process with metal insert has been analyzed. New shape for mold feeding system has been obtained using Hagen-Poiseuille law as guideline and FE model to verify performance of proposed solutions.
DESING OF INJECTION MOLDS FOR FLOATING VALVE SYSTEM USING PET BOTTLES AS FLOATING DEVICE
Mariangel Berroterán | María Virginia Candal | Nelson Colls | Magda Castillo | Luis Marín, November 2011
The plastic parts for a float-valve system were designed. In the design was considered the use of PET bottles as floating device instead of the regular spheres, in order to promote the reuse of this plastic container and to decrease plastics residues. Additionally, the part thickness was reduced to use less plastic on the parts, and to decrease cycle times. All molds are two-plate and two cavities. The refrigerating system proposed uses U-shape channel, and the expulsion system is composed by ejector pins. Threaded connector´s mold is more complex due to require two-step opening.


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Brown, H. L. and Jones, D. H. 2016, May.
"Insert title of paper here in quotes,"
ANTEC 2016 - Indianapolis, Indiana, USA May 23-25, 2016. [On-line].
Society of Plastics Engineers
Available: www.4spe.org.

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